“Childhood Protection and Child Rights

Lex ferenda Breaking the Cycle of Violence within the Child Phd Thesis"According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there is no one "official" definition of mental health. To define Mental Health academicians rely on various theories from cultural differences, subjective assessments, and competing professional.1 This research project has sought its backing in principles of child psychology. By matching and comparing the definition of a “child” in law and psychology, one realise the emerging truth of a lack of understanding in law-making, judiciary and legal pronouncements as to concepts, such as child vulnerability, child needs, and child resilience. In concrete words, what changes for a child who has been victim of sexual violence? What changes for a child who is working day and night in a factory? What changes for a child who is living on the streets? What changes for a child arrested? What changes for a child beaten up by police? Well, the first and foremost change is at the level of mental health. The way she thinks, the way she feels. Mental health of children is an important aspect of child-right study discourse. Through the understanding, one can assure the child is able to ‘bounce back’ and recover from a difficult situation.
What is important to realise is that the mental health promotion dealt with in this research is actually a promotion and prevention in the aftermath of a severe incident or process, in the child’s life. These are the promotion of a child’s special needs, and the prevention of long-term violent impacts on the society. The later chapters deal with the reactions and risks of un-dealt trauma, and societal progress linked to the wellbeing of its children. The research study does not per se differentiate between categories of children. The categories presented here are neither exhaustive nor exclusive. Mostly vulnerable children fall into many of the categories. For instance, street children can also be child labourers, and sexually abused.
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