World War 1 in Mrs Dalloway Novel

This essay discusses that according to Virginia, the carnage of the war laid an everlasting guilt on the consciousness of the British. Seeing invalids walk through Westminster directly recalls the war for some individuals, but performing insignificant tasks like preparing for a party also reveals how the war permeates their consciousness in more subtle ways. These lines from Cymbeline remain in Clarissa’s thoughts throughout the day and remind her that she is not alone in carrying the burden of the fallen soldiers. Living with the constant reminder of death is not unique to Clarissa.
Virginia Woolf is regarded as one of the most, if not the most, important women in the modernism movement. She was the nucleus of early twentieth century literary culture in Great
Britain, which was most famously represented by the Bloomsbury group. As a writer, feminist, and literary critic, her contributions to literature were impressive and enduring. Her novels, written in the stream of consciousness mode, took James Joyce’s new form of writing, exemplified by his novel Ulysses, and perfected it for the public. Through Virginia’s novels, we get a glimpse of how life was changing in postwar Great Britain. These changes, “This sense of the radical difference between the ‘modern’ world and the ‘Edwardian’ one, or more broadly the world before and after the First World War, became a major theme of Virginia’s fiction and are not only in Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse, but also in almost every single one of her works.